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Career

How Ivanka Trump’s Company Is Trying to Balance Business and Politics

Nov. 16, 2016

After she was accused of promoting a $10,800 bracelet from her line

Ivanka Trump’s company is making “adjustments” after coming under fire for touting the $10,800 bracelet she wore during her father’s first interview as president-elect, the Washington Post reported.

A day after the Trump family appeared on 60 Minutes, the vice president of sales for Ivanka Trump Fine Jewelry emailed journalists with a promotional “style alert” broadcasting that the first daughter was wearing a $10,800 bangle from her own jewelry line. It’s unclear whether Trump knew about the email before it was sent, but the soon-to-be first daughter promoted her products throughout the campaign — including tweeting out purchasing details for the Ivanka Trump dress she wore during her speech at the Republican National Convention.

Fashion brands, as the New York Times noted, frequently send out similar emails as promotional and marketing tools. But most fashion brands aren’t run by the daughter of the president-elect of the United States — and the email was seen by critics as an attempt for the Trumps to profit off the presidency.

“This notification was sent by a well-intentioned marketing employee at one of our companies who was following customary protocol, and who, like many of us, is still making adjustments post-election,” a spokeswoman for Trump said in a statement, according to NBC News. “We are proactively discussing new policies and procedures with all of our partners going forward.”

But the incident heightens concerns about how Trump will navigate around potential conflicts of interest during his presidency. The president-elect is also the chairman and president of the Trump Organization, and has said that he’ll transfer control of his business to his three children, who won’t have an official role in his administration. But his three children — all members of their father’s presidential transition team — were reportedly key advisers to Trump throughout his campaign, and many predict they’ll wield some sort of influence in the White House.

[The Washington Post]